May 31, 2017

CSEP, along with CHEO-HALO, PHAC and ParticipACTION, announce the launch of Build Your Best Day to help children and youth and their parents learn about the Canadian 24-Hour Movement Guidelines in a fun way.

Imagine running from zombies, riding a unicorn or sleeping in a bed full of puppies all in one day. Sound like the best day possible for a child? Well it’s also the healthiest one, with Build Your Best Day.

Released this week, Build Your Best Day is a fun, interactive and educational web experience that lets kids imagine a day where they can do anything they want, all the while learning about the Canadian 24-Hour Movement Guidelines for Children and Youth in a fun way. Choosing activities—both real and imagined—teaches kids about the balance of sweating, stepping, sleeping and sitting they need each day to be healthy:

  • Sweat – 60 minutes of heart-pumping physical activity

  • Step – several hours of light physical activity

  • Sleep – 9-11 hours of sleep per night for children aged 5-13 years, and 8-10 hours for those aged 14-17 years

  • Sit – no more than two hours of recreational screen time and limited sitting for extended periods

The Healthy Active Living and Obesity Research Group at the Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario Research Institute (CHEO-HALO), the Canadian Society for Exercise Physiology (CSEP), the Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC) and ParticipACTION created Build Your Best Day to help children and youth and their parents learn about the Canadian 24-Hour Movement Guidelines. The site also includes educational tools and resources for educators, parents and health professionals to download, and will be supported by a digital marketing campaign.

“Following Canada’s release last year of the world’s first 24-Hour Movement Guidelines for Children and Youth we are proud to be a partner in creating this new online experience to help children and their parents understand how to build their best day with activities that meet the guidelines. The development of the guidelines and the activation of the guidelines is a key part of CSEP’s continued work to be a leader in integrating research into the promotion of fitness, performance, and health outcomes for Canadians,” says Mary Duggan, Manger, Canadian Society for Exercise Physiology.

more information

For more information on the development of the Canadian 24-Hour Movement Guidelines for Children and Youth: An Integration of Physical Activity, Sedentary Behaviour, and Sleep visit: www.csep.ca/guidelines.

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